St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

This forum is for discussion about the Uí Ailella specifically.
Post Reply
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

Image

From The Tripartite Life Of Saint Patrick, pp. 93-99:
[1] Then Patrick went into the province of Connaught by Snám dá Én over the Shannon. There Patrick found the fertas (bar? bank?), namely, the earth was raised up under Patrick in the ford; and the learned still find that ridge. And he went into the harbour at once, and there died Buad-moel, Patrick's charioteer, and was buried in that place. Cell Buadmóil is its name, and it belongs to Patrick.

[2] Now when the wizards of Loegaire, son of Niall, heard of all the things that Patrick was doing (they were) Moel and Caplait, two brothers; it is they that reared Loegaire's two daughters, Ethne the Fair and Fedelm the Ruddy—they brought thick darknesses over the whole of Mag Ai, through might of the devil, for the space of three days and three nights. Then Patrick made prayer to God, and bent his knees, and sained the plain so that it was dark to the wizards and light unto every one (else). And he gave thanks unto God. All the darknesses were banished from Mag Ai.

[3] And they went over the Shannon to Duma Graid. Therein he ordained Ailbe an archpresbyter, and he is in Sen-chua with the descendants of Ailill; and Patrick informed him of a stone altar in Sliab Hua-n-Ailella under the ground, with four glass chalices at the four angles of the altar, et dixit, “Beware of breaking the edges of the excavation.” For he was among the descendants of Ailill. And he baptized holy Mane, whom bishop Brón son of Icne ordained, [and] who is in Caisel Irroe, a servant of God, a companion of Patrick.

[4] Patrick went to Mag Glass. There he founded Cell Mór Maige Glaiss, and left therein two of his household, namely Conleng and Ercleng. Then he came into the territory of Corcu-Ochland to this side of the Hui-Ailella and to the north of Badgna. Two brothers were biding in that place, namely, Id and Hono: wizards were they. Said Hono to Patrick, “What wilt thou give me for that land?” Said Patrick, “Life eternal.” Said Hono, “Thou hast gold: give (some) to me for it.” Patrick replied, “I have given my gold to all, but God will give (me) other (gold).” He afterwards found a lump of gold where the swine were rooting, and Patrick gave him that mass of gold for his land. Tír in Brotha (i.e., the land of the mass.) is its name. Then said Patrick, “Thou shalt not be a king, nor shall any of thy seed reign for ever.” But Patrick took pity on his tears, saying: “He shall not be king whom thou [i.e. thy posterity] wilt not accept and wilt not ordain.” Which thing hath been fulfilled. The race of Macc Erce is the mightiest and firmest in Connaught; but they do not rule like overkings.

[5] Óno, son of Oengus, son of Erc the Red, son of Brón, from whom descend the Húi-Ónach, offered his dwelling to Patrick; and Imlech Onand was its name then, but Ail Find (White Stone) to-day. The place is named Ail-find from the stone (ail) which was raised out of the well that was made by Patrick in the green and which stands on the brink of the well: it is called from the water [find (fair)]. And Patrick said, “Thy seed shall be blessed, and there shall be victory of laymen and clerics from thee for ever, and they shall have the inheritance of this place.” And he placed there Assicus and Bite son of Assicus, and Cipia mother of Bite the bishop. The holy bishop Assicus was Patrick's copper-smith, and he made altars and quadrangular tables and quadrangular book-covers in honour of Patrick, and one of these quadrangular tables was in Armagh, and another in Ailfind, and another in Domnach Mór Maige Seolai, on the altar of Felart the holy bishop with the Húi-Briuin Seolai far westward from Ailfind.

[6] However, Assicus [in shame because of a lie told by him,] went in flight into the north, to Sliab Liacc in Tír Boguini. He abode seven years in an island there, and his monks were seeking him, and after (much) trouble found him in the mountain-glens, and brought him thence with them, and he (namely Assicus) died with them in the wilderness, and they buried him in Raith Cungai in Serthe, for he had declared that he would not go again into Mag-Ái on account of the falsehood which had been uttered by him there. Hence is said, “Time to travel into Serthe.” And the king of the land gave to him, and to his monks after his death, the grazing of a hundred cows with their calves and of twenty oxen, as a permanent offering. His relics are in Raith Cungai, and to Patrick belongs the church (although) the community of Colomb Cille and Ard Sratha have come down [encroached] upon it.

[7] Patrick went from Ail Find to Dumacha Húa n-Ailella, and founded a church there, namely Senchell Dumaige, and left therein Maichet and Cetchen and Rodan an archpresbyter, and Mathona Benén's sister, who took the veil from Patrick and from Rodan, and was a monkess of theirs.

[8] While Patrick was biding at Duma Graid, ordaining the great host, he smiled. “What is that?” saith Benén. “Not hard to say,” saith Patrick. “Brón and Monk Olcán are coming towards me along the Strand of Eothaile, and my pupil Mac Erca is with them. The wave of the flood made a great dash (at them), and the boy was afraid of being carried away.” That was a prophecy.

[9] Then he went through the bounds of Húi-Ailella, and founded the church east in Tamnach, and it was covered by God and by men. And she (Mathona) made friendship with Saint Rodan's relics, and their successors feasted in turns. But after this they placed by the holy church in Tamnach bishop Cairell, whom Patrick's bishops, Brón and Bite, ordained.
It is certain as can be that Snám dá Én is the modern day Drumsna (Droim ar Snámh, “the ridge of the swimming place”), Co. Leitrim.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drumsna ]

The harbour would be on the Charlestown peninsula and the land between Duma Graid (Doon of Drumsna) and the west bank of the Shannon River. It is very probable there was a harbour or point of portage for boats on the Shannon River on the west bank after crossing over from Drumsna.

Cell Buadmóil seems to be lost to time, although it would appear to be between the Doon of Drumsna and the Shannon River.

The second paragraph seems to be an added afterthought of a purely hagiographical nature, or "junk", which is picked up again later for St. Patrick's visit to Crúachan on p. 99.

As mentioned, Duma Graid is a certain as can be the Doon of Drumsna. Graid could be a contraction of rígraid (genitive case) which refers to kings, chiefs, or princes; so Duma Graid = Duma Rígraid, or Mound (Bulwark) of the Kings, which would be very apropos of the Doon of Drumsna.
[ https://dcg.genealogy.network/article-d ... msna.xhtml ]

Senchau is Shancough Parish in the Barony of Tirrell, Co. Sligo. Note that it only says Ailbe was ordained as archpresbyter at this time, but NOT in Senchau, rather at the Doon of Drumsna. St. Patrick tells of the stone alter at Slíab Uí Ailella, which is identified by some as Carrane (Corran) Hill in Co. Sligo, because he was among the Uí Ailella at the Doon of Drumsna. He also baptized Bishop Maine of the Uí Ailella at the Doon of Drumsna.
[ https://www.sligoheritage.com/Archnewsround.htm St. Patrick in Sligo ]
[ https://www.logainm.ie/en/2145 ]
[ https://mountainviews.ie/summit/590/ ]

Bishop Maine was ordained by Bishop Brón, but it was apparently Bishop Brón, not Bishop Maine, who was later in Caisel Irroe, which was the earlier name for Killaspugbrone, or Cill Easpaig Brón, meaning “The Church of Bishop Brón”. It was located on the coast west of Sligo Town and near the modern resort of Strandhill. The structure of the sentence “And he baptized holy Mane, whom bishop Brón son of Icne ordained, [and] who is in Caisel Irroe, a servant of God, a companion of Patrick.” apparently should be more like “And he baptized holy Maine, a servant of God, a companion of Patrick, whom bishop Brón son of Icne, who is in Caisel Irroe, ordained.”
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killaspugbrone ]

There are TWO different Moyglass Townlands in Co. Roscommon, as indicated on the left side of the map above. It is my STRONG belief that the one mentioned in The Tripartite Life is the northern one because it is located in Kilmore Parish, near the Doon of Drumsna AKA Duma Graid; and Kilmore = Cell Mór. It is also more in line with St. Patrick's journey route.

Sources seem to agree that Corca Achlann was comprised of the 3 parishes of Bumlin, Kiltrustan and Cloonfinlough. Those are the 3 parishes shown on the left of the map above, although the southernmost Cloonfinlough Parish looks like 2 separate parishes. Compare to the boundaries of Corca Achlann on the right.
[ Topographical Poems, p. xl, note 303 ]
[ http://sites.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/connacht.htm#ach ]
[ https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-p ... /pp334-341 ]

It is unclear whether “This side of the Hui-Ailella” means to the south or the east of the Uí Ailella; but Bádgna = Slieve Bawn. This fits the older map on the right, as well as the newer map on the left, rather well. What this indicates to me is that Tír Briúin na Sinna was probably originally part of the Uí Ailella territory; and that the Uí Ailella were probably the designated Dál Cuinn guardians/keepers of the Doon Of Drumsna.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slieve_Bawn ]
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Tuathas ]

The story of Óno and Id/Ith is somewhat confusing. It is said that it was in Corcu Ochland/Corca Achlann, but is later identified as Elphin. T. H. Knox, in his opus The History Of The County Of Mayo, p. 20, says:
The Three Tuaths, Hy Briuin na Sinna, Corcachland, and Cinel Dobhtha, claimed descent from Erc Derg, son of Brian. But the Book of Armagh and the Tripartite Life make it clear that they came from Erc, son of Bron, of the Corca Chonluain. Descendants of the Erc from whom they came seem to be the Maicne Erc, sons of Heric, who were in Moylurg in St. Patrick's time. These appear to be the Hy Broin, who were distinguished from Hy Briuin by Tirechan, who calls them [Filii] Briuin and Filii Broin. Though they do not descend from Brian, it is not unlikely that the Corca Chonluain had a common ancestor with the Conmaicne, and so being of the royal race, were not under tribute, being included in the direct dominions of the King of Silmurray, as the Calry are omitted because immediately under the Hy Fiachrach kings, as I suppose. Beyond this we know not who were in possession of the rest of Magh Ai and of the Three Tuaths.
But I cannot find the Corca Con Lúain anywhere else. They are called the Corca Ochland or Achland everywhere that I can find; although I did find that some think this is an alias for Corca Sechlainn. So IDK where Knox got Corca Con Lúain.
[ https://www.libraryireland.com/names/ir ... chlann.php ]
[ https://www.electricscotland.com/webcla ... ney/20.htm ]
[ https://www.electricscotland.com/webcla ... ney/80.htm ]

From the first Electric Scotland link above:
It is significant in this connection that the land for St. Patrick’s church at Elphin in County Roscommon was originally donated for that purpose by the Archdruid Ona. The descendants of Ona, the Corca Achlan or Corca Seachlann, of the same stock as the Ciarraighe (see Chapter VIII), branched into several families. The main family here was that of MacBrannan (Mac Branain) or O’Brannan (Ó Branain), a branch of whom, known as the Ui Branain, later the Maclnerneys or Nerneys (Mac an Airchinnigh, literally "son of the Erenagh"), were, interestingly enough, erenaghs (hereditary abbots) of St. Patrick’s church at Elphin. A family of O’Brannans served as Erenaghs of Derryvullan in County Fermanagh. Another branch of the Corca Seachlann, the Cineal Mac Erca or O’Monahans (Ó Manachain) faked a descent from the Ui Briuin, and were called the Ui Briuin na Sionna.
This states the Corca Achlann were NOT Dál Cuinn, but rather Ciarraige. Yet Bishop Maine of the Uí Ailella clearly says the Meicc Ercca, the Sons of Ercc, were his brethren in The Tripartite Life, p. 145; which contradicts this. So were Ono and Id/Ith (Dobthae?) Uí Ailella? The Tripartite Life lists these men as the 6 sons of Brión on p. 107:
  1. Bolc Derc (Bolc the Red) <=> Óengus Baillderg
  2. Derthacht <=> Durthach
  3. Eichen <=> Eichin
  4. Cremthan <=> Crimhthann
  5. Coelcharna <=> Cáel Cárna
  6. Echaid <=> Eóchád
The names on the right are from the traditional genealogies. Dau Galach is missing but either he was already dead at the time, OR, he was at Crúachan, not at Duma Selce, where the meeting with the other 6 sons is recorded as occurring. And I cannot find a reconciliation between Id/Ith and Dobthae as the brother of Óno. Were there THREE brothers: Óno, Id/Ith, and Dobthae? Dobthae's story is related as an ancestor of St. Berach. His genealogy is given as:
Dobtha, son of Aengus, son of Erc the Red, son of Brian, son of Eochaid Muigmedon
[ https://celt.ucc.ie/published/T201000F/text003.html ]
But The Tripartite Life gives the genealogy of Óno as:
Óno, son of Oengus, son of Erc the Red, son of Brón
I am convinced that the addition of Ercc Derg as a son of Brión came about due to conflation of Brión with Brón, which seems to be backed up by the fact that The Tripartite Life does not list Ercc Derg as a son of Brión. Bolc Derc has a similar meaning to Baillderg, so I am convinced that Bolc Derc is NOT Ercc Derg, but rather Óengus Baillderg, as shown. Further, the Cenél Dobthai, the descendants of the putative brother of Óno, have long been regarded as Uí Briúin, but again, The Tripartite Life clearly says otherwise.

So, are the Corca Achlann Mac Branáin/Brennan, Cenél Dobthai Ó hAinlige/O’Hanly and the Uí Briúin inda Sinna Ó Máenacháin/O’Monaghan septs of the Uí Ailella? If so, then I expect to find them under one of the 9 unknown direct sublcades of R1b-DF105:
  1. R1b-FT191133
  2. R1b-BY21184
  3. R1b-BY35737
  4. R1b-BY35748
  5. R1b-Y61966
  6. R1b-FT154049
  7. R1b-FT168547
  8. R1b-FGC65031
  9. R1b-FT206923
Otherwise, if they are descendants of the original Corca Achlann, I would not expect them to necessarily even be R1b-M222+.

Paragraph 6 about the Bishop Assicus is a parenthetical insertion whose main purpose seems to be to assert the See of Armagh's control over the church at Raith Cungai; so more hagiographical junk.

Dumacha Húa n-Ailella and the church there, namely Senchell Dumaige, appear to have been just to the west of Elphin in what is now Shankill Townland in Shankill Parish, Co. Roscommon. This again begs the questions of where the southern and eastern boundaries of Uí Ailella abutted the northern and western boundaries of Corca Achlann, and who did Óno, Id/Ith, and/or Dobthae descend from.

Paragraph 8 is more hagiographical junk to basically be ignored.

Paragraph 9 is a grammatical syntax nightmare, apparently because of the insertion of paragraph 8. “The text is in great confusion, owing, apparently, to the interpolation of the last preceding paragraph...It appears from the Book of Armagh, 12, a. 1, that it was Mathona that founded the church in Tamnach and made friendship to S. Rodan's relics, whatever this may mean.” So St. Patrick did NOT make a wild turn to the north from Shankill before going to Crúachan. Tamnach is now Tawnagh Townland in Tawnagh Parish, Barony of Tirerrill, Co. Sligo.
[ https://www.logainm.ie/en/57321 ]

All of this indicates the the original territory of the Uí Ailella may have extended from as far north as Sligo Town to as far south as Elphin.
From Moyglass (near Toberpatrick) Patrick went into the territory known as Corca Ochland, as it is called in the Tripartite (Life of Patrick). It was north of Sliabh Badgna, now Slieve Bawn, the most conspicuous object on the southern horizon; but it was on ‘this side,’ that is, to the south of Hy Ailella, for the men of Tirerrill then claimed as their own all the mountain land from Lough Gill, near Sligo, to the neighbourhood of Elphin. At the present time the district is comprised in the barony of Roscommon, and was always considered a part of Magh Ai. But the term ‘Corcagh Achlann’ was in later times more properly applied to the eastern part of the district from Strokestown to Elphin, which was the tribe-land of the O’Brennans and O’Hanlys.
[ https://irelandxo.com/ireland-xo/histor ... inn-elphin ]
Conflation of names, both places and people, and misunderstanding of correct grammatical syntax are the 2 biggest banes of early Irish records. A very clear example of this is the conflation of the names Brón and Brión, which are two very distinct and separate names. For another example, please see this post in The Uí Maini Puzzle thread about the conflation of Áth do Laaraic near Boyle, Co. Roscommon with Áth-dá-Laracc in Cenannus, that is Kells, in The Tripartite Life, p. 105.
Lárac is an Irish word meaning 'limb' or 'thigh', and it is found in other Gaelic place-names, for example Áth dá Loracc near Kells (Co. Meath) recorded in 1176 and Áth do Laaraic near Boyle (Co. Roscommon) first mentioned in 1197.
[ https://www.academia.edu/es/1499801/Vik ... _Waterford ]
Overall, there is a lot of good info in The Tripartite Life; sadly, it became adulterated with later hagiographical junk. But it is still worth studying with a cautious eye towards obvious conflation and grammatical syntax errors.
Image
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

St. Patrick's Itinerarium In Connacht

Image

On the map above the townlands with the same name as their containing parish are used as the best location, although this might not be accurate in fact. Further, this post, while referring to the same material as that in the first post below, is an attempt to deal just with the places and place names that St. Patrick visited on the first part of his journey in Connacht, and not the events described in those places. From The Tripartite Life Of Saint Patrick (hereafter referred to as TL):
  1. Snám Dá Én
  2. Harbor - Cell Búadmáil/Buadmóil
  3. Dumae Graid
  4. Mag Glass - Cell Mór Maig Glaiss
  5. Corcu Ochland - Ail Find
  6. Dumacha úa nAilella - Senchell Dumaige
  7. Crúachan - Sendomnach Maig Ái
  8. Tír Cairedo - Sendomnach Aird Licci
  9. Ard Senlis
  10. Mag Nento
  11. Uí Ailella - Bishop Cethec's home???
  12. Uí Maini - Fidarta
  13. Cell Garad - Uaran nGar
  14. Mag Selce - Domnach Mór Maig Selce & Bríon's 6 sons
  15. Crecraige - Druimnea/Drumne
  16. Crecraige - Cell Atrachta
  17. Meic Ercca - curses them
  1. The best fit for Snám Dá Én, that is, "swimming place of the two birds" by most translations, is Drumsna, Co. Leitrim, or Droim ar Snám, that is, "ridge of the swimming place". The description of Snám Dá Én in TL says: "There Patrick found the fertas (bar? bank?), namely, the earth was raised up under Patrick in the ford; and the learned still find that ridge." In this instance, a druimm, that is, "ridge", is a synonym to a fertas, that is, "A raised bank or ridge of earth or sand, generally of a bar or shallow near the sea-shore or a ford in a river;".

    Some, such as the Rev. Dr. John Healy, Archbishop of Tuam, in his work The Life And Writings Of Saint Patrick, have tried to identify the crossing as Drumboylan, which is too far north for the events that occurred immediately after the crossing. This misidentification appears to be due to tunnel vision that the territory of the Uí Ailella was always limited to the Barony of Tirerrill. John O’Donovan apparently identified a Snám Dá Én near Clonmacoise, but this would have been too far south for the events that occurred immediately after the crossing.
  2. The harbor would most likely be a riverfront settlement on the west bank of the Shannon River, possibly in Drumcleavry Townland, Co. Roscommon. It could also have been one of the neighboring townlands as well: Charlestown, Cloonavery, Ardanaffrin, Lackagh, Corry, or Cloonteem.

    Cell Búadmáil/Buadmóil, unfortunately, appears to have been lost to time. Rev. Dr. Healy tried to make a case that "Boylan" in Drumboylan was a corruption of Búadmael/Buad-moel, the name of St. Patrick's charioteer who died immediately after the crossing; but it seems too far-fetched. The name Búadmael/Buad-moel seems to be a compound of búaid, that is, "victory or triumph", and máel, that is, "slave or servant, hence devoted to". It is interesting to speculate that Cloonteem MIGHT be a corruption of clúain, that is, "meadow, pasture-land, glade, lawn", and túaim, that is, "also a tomb, grave or sepulchre"; and thus a vague remembrance of Búadmael's grave.
  3. Since St. Patrick almost certainly crossed the Shannon River at Drumsna, then Dumae Graid MUST be the Doon of Drumsna; despite Rev. Dr. Healy's misidentification as Doogary Townland, which is too far west near Ballaghaderreen. Even if Rev. Dr. Healy meant Dorrary Townland, it was too far south of Drumboylan Townland, being just a little west of the Carrick-on-Shannon crossing.

    The Doon of Drumsna was a massive construction spanning a 1 mile length across the Charlestown peninsula from bank to bank of the Shannon River. There were also associated fortifications on the west bank of the Shannon River to protect possible crossing points near Drumsna. It is my speculation that Graid is a trunction of rígrad, that is, " Kings, chiefs, princes (collectively), also a line (family) of kings". So Dumae Rígraid would be the "Embankment of the Kings". This is very appropos given that the Doon of Drumsna has long been associated with Queen Medb, according to the late, local Drumsna historian Tony Ward; as well as its massive size to protect one of the easiest crossings from the east into Connacht. The scale of the construction almost certainly could not have been supported by a local chieftain. Also of note is the fact that its construction techinque and design is reminiscent of La Tène fortifications in continental Europe, to which it is dated to the latter end of the same period.
  4. Just west of the Doon of Drumsna is Moyglass Townland. Although there is a second Moyglass Townland in Co. Roscommon it is located farther south in Kilglass Parish, which effectively puts it in the Corca Achlann territory, which had not yet been visited according to TL. This was discussed in the first post below. So Moyglass Townland, adjacent to the Doon of Drumsna, in Kilmore Parish, a remembrance of Cell Mór, is almost certainly the location where St. Patrick established Cell Mór Maig Glaiss.
  5. As mentioned in the first post below, St. Patrick's next sojourn was in Corca Achlann/Corca Sechlainn/Corcu Ochland; specifically in Ail Find/Elphin where he bought land from the druid Óno to establish an ecclesiastical foundation. From the gathering evidence, Elphin must have been in the extreme northwestern part of Corca Achlann at the time.
  6. St. Patrick then journeyed a very short distance west to Dumacha úa nAilella where he established Senchell Dumaige, which is remembered in the name of Shankill Townland and Parish.
  7. From Shankill we are told he journeyed to Crúachan, around Tulsk Townland, and are related a very fanciful meeting with two of King Láegaire's daughters. He established Sendomnach Maig Ái there, but I cannot find a specific location since it is called "an earthen church" in some sources.
  8. St. Patrick next journeyed to Tír Cairedo, which is generally identified as the area around Castlerea, and sojourned at Ard Licce, which is a little west of Castlerea around Cloonalis Townland, and established Sendomnach Arda/Aird Licci.
    St. Patrick arrives at Fairymount

    In 437 the holy virgin Lallocc (daughter of Darerca, niece of St. Patrick and foster sister of Cormac) was brought by Patrick and Bishop Cathach to Ard Senlis (ancient name of Fairymount/Mullach na Sí). They came 5 miles north from Ard-Lice near Cloonalis where they founded a church and left Deacon Caoimhín.

    From him the church came to be called Kilkeevin (now Casterea parish) and the parish naturally took its title from the church. The old church was little more than a mile from Castlerea, to the west, and its ruins, or rather its site, in the old churchyard may still be seen, near the mansion of O’Conor Don, at Cloonalis.
    It is interesting to note that the parish name, Kilkeevin, derived from the ecclesiastic who was initially installed there, Deacon Cáemán, rather than the name of the church, like with Shankill for Senchell Dumaige. He must have left a strong impression with his congregation.
  9. He then went a few miles north to Ard Senlis, and established an ecclesiastical foundation there for St. Lallócc.
    St. Patrick arrives at Fairymount (continued)

    In Fairymount, on the side of Maighean Íontach (Moyne), a mile west of the old fort on top of Ard Senlis, Patrick founded a church to which Lallocc gave her name, Cill Lallocc, a name which down the years has been very badly pronounced and the spot is now known as Cill i Hooley. There are no ruins of the church, but it was known as sacred ground and was used as a burial place for unbaptised infants until a short time ago. Near it he obtained another church site in Magh Nento. It would appear that Lallocc had her convent and oratory at some distance from the church of Magh Nento. The place is now known as Fairy Mount, a conspicuous hill about five miles north of Castlerea. Magh Nento was the surrounding plain.

    The site of the old Don Lios in Fairymount is the present Carn Cloch on the summit of Fairymount hill (the highest point in Co. Roscommon). It commands a great view over Airteach and to Cruachán. The name 'Ard Sean Lios' and 'Maighean Íontach' have disappeared in the last 30 years. The name 'Mullach na Sí' has been adopted and there are two meanings given for its origin by old people. Mullach na Sídhe - the mount of the whirlwinds (586 ft.) and Fairymount – the hill of the fairies supposed to be given to it by ancient pagans who saw Lallocc and her holy virgins in the distance near Ard Sean Lios. There remains no other name as a saint other than St. Lalocc in the Fairymount area.
    It is unlikely that St. Lallócc, a woman, was installed at a church, but rather some other ecclesiastical foundation such as a nunnery. This is why a church had to be established nearby in Mag Nento.
  10. St. Patrick then went a short distance from Ard Senlis/Moyne into Mag Nento and established a church there. See the quote above. What is interesting is that no name for the ecclesiastic of this church is given. The church must not have thrived as there appears to be no trace of it in the area.
  11. Next, we are given a great deal of information about Bishop Cethech. There seems to be controversy about the journey to Bishop Cethech's homeland. There is also controversy about whether it was his father who was from Meath and his mother was Uí Ailella or vice versa, but TL is clear it was his mother who was Uí Ailella. There is perhaps difficulty with the verb tense in this section. Whether St. Patrick and his entourage went to Bishop Cethech's homeland at this time, or whether they went at a later time may play into the confusion; because if the journey to Bishop Cethech's homeland came later, then from Mag Nento they went to Fidarta in Uí Maini territory.
  12. Fidarta has almost universally been identified as Fuerty Townland and Parish, which definitely fits the accepted location of the Uí Maini in southern Co. Roscommon and Co. Galway. However! Notice how far south Fuerty is from Fairymount/Mag Nento. Interestingly, there is a Figh Townland just a little west of Moyne Townland/Fairymount/Mag Nento. Logainm says that Figh derives from Fidh, which comes from fid, that is, "a wood or grove". Fidarta appears to be a compound of fid and arta. Arta may be the genitive case of art, which has several similar meanings, that is, "bear; solid, strong, stout, a stone; god; power, strength".

    So Fidarta becomes Fid Arta. Artach/Artagh would be adjective forms of art. This is important because Figh Townland is in the Artagh North/Airteach Thuaidh Electoral District. Artach is purportedly the origin for Airteach, which was the name of the territory where Castlerea and Fairymount are located. This derivation of Fidarta is certainly more straightforward than Fuerty AND it has the advantage of being a short journey from Mag Nento. If this interpretation is correct, it puts a whole new spin on where and who the Uí Maini were at the time of St. Patrick. Deacon Íus/Just was installed at Fidarta, but it was the place name that remained, not the ecclesiastic's name.
  13. Then we are told that St. Patrick's Franks/Gauls left his entourage and established their own foundations, seeking his counsel on where to locate them. We are told there were several places bestowed upon them, but only one is mention: Imgae Baislicci. This has been identified as Baslick Townland. It is interesting to note that it was the word baislec, that is, "church or basilica" that was preserved, rather than the name Imgae, which appears to be a compound of im, that is, "the", and gae, that is, "a spear, a javelin".

    We are told that St. Patrick pointed out the location of Imgae Baislicci from Cell Garad, and that it was between Uí Maini and Mag Ái. Baslick Townland does not really fit this location if one is thinking of Fuerty being the location of Uí Maini. But if Uí Maini is to the west of Airteach, which is where Baslick Townland is located, then it does fit quite well.

    But now we come to the problem of the location of Cell Garad and its venerated spring: Úarán Gar. It has been identified as Oran Townland for centuries, but that makes no sense, given how far south it is from Baslick. Úarán has the meaning of "a spring, a well spring or fountain". Gar has the meaning of "easy, likely, pleasant, convenient"; and I can find no indication that gar would have any declension that would produce garad. Instead, garad has a meaning of "a den, a cave" or a personal name.

    So, it would appear that gar and garad became conflated, so the venerated spring was Úarán Gar, not Úarán Garad; but near which Cell Garad was founded. Also, please note that Bishop Cethech was installed and buried at Cell Garad. Then we have the issue of the place name. From the other examples, we would expect the place name to evolve to Kilgary or Kilcahee or something similar, but not Oran. However, no such place name appears to have survived in the vicinity of Baslick.

    However! There is a Garrynport Townland between Elphin and Castlerea. I cannot find if it is an elevated spot or not. But for its derivation, it could be a compound of garad, in, and port, that is, "a place occupied by some one, a stead, abode; as of a monastic stead or settlement"; so, Cave of the Monastery. Further, its location would place it in the southernmost part of the Uí Ailella territory at the time, from all the other evidence given; which would fit with being in Bishop Cethech's maternal homeland. So perhaps the earlier mention of journeying to Bishop Cethech's homeland was referring to the journey from Fidarta to Cell Garad.

    It is interesting to note that Garrynport Townland is in the Bellanagare Electoral Division. Attempting to discern the origin of Bellanagare, it is possible it might be a compound of baile, that is, " place, settlement, farm; village , town, city"; na, that is, "of the"; and garad. So that is was the "Townland of the Cave". There is no confirmed derivation for Bellenagare on Logainm yet, however.

    In addition, Garrynport Townland adjoins Kilvoy Townland on the east. Logainm has Kilvoy as deriving from "Cill Bheó Aodha, Beo-Aedh's church"; but while there are 2 different Bheó Aodha ecclesiatics mentioned in the records, neither one seems appropriate. So the derivation for Kilvoy MAY be inaccurate. An alternate derivation COULD be as a compound of cell and búide, that is, "affection, tenderness, attachment" or buide, that is, "a vessel for holding liquids, especially milk". Regardless, it is significant there was a church here at one time.

    There is also a somewhat apocryphal story of Queen Medb visiting the Spring of Uaran Garad, presumably from her residence at Crúachan. The location of Garrynport would certainly easily allow that.

    All of this is very speculative for setting the location of Cell Garad as Garrynport, but the circumstantial evidence is quite intriguing.
  14. Then comes the great mystery: the location of Dumae/Mag/Loch Selce, where St. Patrick met the 6 sons of Brión and established Domnach Mór Maige Selce. Several places have been postulated, but nothing has ever been definitively proven. I speculate that it may have been at Loch Cé; that Selce is an erroneous compound of sel, that is, "a turn, frequently of the alternation of the right of succession as, for instance, between different branches of a family; a while, a spell; a certain distance", and the personal name Cé, a mythical druid whose death caused the formation of Loch Cé.

    It best fits the location of the residence of the most royal family of the time in Connacht, the Uí Briúin. It's location would put it in the Uí Ailella territory, but it's grandeur make's it possible it may have been a separate demesne. Again, this is pure speculation, but it does have some merit to it based on St. Patrick's sojourn in the territory of the Crecraige afterwards.
  15. Druimnea/Drumne is difficult to identify. It is also referenced as "Drummana was the name of the place in which they were biding. It is (called) Machare to-day." Dr. Liam Páraic Ó hAisibéil in his thesis work on place names in Co. Roscommon identifies a region called Machairí na Búille that is south of the River Boyle and west of Loch Cé and east of Loch Techet. There is a townland on the north bank of the River Boyle called Droim Inneona/Drumanone and another on the south bank called Brén Droim/Breandrum. Both of these would fit the general description of Druimnea/Drumne. Although we are told a church was established here, no ecclesiastic is named.
  16. Cell Atrachta is identified as Killaraght Townland and Parish. However, there may be some confusion as to which place was the original Cell Atrachta and which may have been Druimnea/Drumne. There is an Annagh Townland in Killaraght Parish that is on a peninsula that juts into Loch Techet that has remains of an old ecclesiastical foundation. So it is possible that Cell Atrachta was established in Annagh Townland and Druimnea/Drumne in Killaraght Townland and that the name was transferred in later times.
  17. Finally, we are told that St. Patrick went to meet one of his main nemeses in Connacht, the Sons of Ercc. We are not told where this meeting took place in the text at this point, but later we are told he encountered them at Ess macc nEirc/Assylin, just slightly west of Boyle near a ford by a famous cataract/waterfall. Perhaps this encounter is out of order and the meeting with the Sons of Ercc occurred between his sojourn at Mag Selce and Druimnea/Drumne. This would better fit the itinerarium of journeying from Cell Atrachta back to Airteach, but not to a significant extent.
This interpretation of the first part of St. Patrick's itinerarium in Connacht, as presented in TL, certainly produces a much more compact area for his journeys: all in central and northern Co. Roscommon without any forays into southern Co. Roscommon. The logistics for an entourage and traveling by chariot would be greatly simplified in this scenario. Further study needs to be done to verify this interpretation; but if it holds up, we are presented with an intriguing account of the early territories of both the Uí Ailella AND the Uí Maini that diverge significantly from the long accepted versions.
Image
BuckeyeMike
Genelach Member
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat, 2021-Feb-06 4:56 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by BuckeyeMike »

The logic of this information seems unequivocal. The Ui Ailella and Ui Maine seem one in the same. This diatribe is my simplified/condensed version. I hope I didn't skip too much.

I am beginning to sense a pattern. What is the possibility the Ui Maine/Ui Ailella are actually the same sept divided like the Ui Briuin and Ui Fiachrach. Using the map below (sorry, haven’t figured out the overlayed Townlands maps):

1. 2nd-3rd century AD, Medb holds court with her ‘Maine’ sons over a huge territory, from near Lough Derg in the south (Ui Maine & Ui Fiachrach Aidne) all the way north to Lough Gill and the River Moy (Ui Ailella & Ui Fiachrach Mauide). In fact, nearly ALL of Connacht was the 'Maine' playground.

2. 4th-5th century AD; the (possibly) original Ui Briuin territory near Lough Corrib (Ui Briuin Seola), splitting the two Ui Fiachrach septs in the west of Medb’s former ‘Maine’ territory. The Ui Ailello take control of the western half, temporarily. Ailella’s descent ends @ 400AD. Tie in St. Patrick at Loch Cé ("a turn, frequently of the alternation of the right of succession as, for instance, between different branches of a family;”) Ui Ailella for Ui Maine perhaps?
The Uí Ailello were later replaced as the third of the Three Connachta, through genealogical sleight of hand, by the Uí Maine. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U%C3%AD_Bri%C3%BAin).
That “slight of hand” was simply a change in nominclature, not in DNA. Also, Loch Ce, near Boyle...in Magh Luirg

3. 6th-7th century; Ui Briuin Seola are now the main Ui Briuin and force their Ui Briuin AI and Ui Briuin Breifne cousins north and east splitting the Ui Ailella sept. The northern families retain the Ui Ailella name, the southern branch retains the Ui Maine name, BUT THEY ARE STILL DIRECT COUSINS.

4. 8th-9th century; Ui Briuin Sil Cellaig?? attack the Ui Maine/Ui Ailella in Delbna Nudat; the border of both Magh Luirg and Ui Maine. Delbna Nudat is now Ui Briuin Sil Cellaig.
The Sil Cellach get weaker until Colla mac Forggus becomes their last king of Connacht @796AD.

5. 10th-11th century: Eventually, Mael Ruanaid Mor Sil Cellach?? (the first king of Moylurg) makes a deal with Ui Conchobair @960AD as protection from Ui Maine/Ui Ailella and moves further north in Magh Luirg.

6. 11th-12th century; Ui Maine/Ui Ailella retaliate and “slaughter Ui Maelruanaid” Sil Cellach?? in 1048AD, working their way up the River Shannon while fighting with the Ui Briuin Ai Ui Conchobar to their west.

7. Ui Briuin Sil Cellach??, with the help of Ui Briuin Ai Ui Conchobar, regain Magh Luirg, Diarmait mac Tadg Mor becomes the 7th king @ 1140AD, forces the Ui Maine/Ui Ailella back into southern Roscommon where they become conflated with one of the other unrelated the Ua Cellaigh of Hy-Many.
...the territory of the Uí Ailella was always limited to the Barony of Tirerrill. John O’Donovan apparently identified a Snám Dá Én near Clonmacoise, but this would have been too far south for the events that occurred immediately after the crossing.
This definitely puts Ui Maine/Ui Ailella in their ancestral regions; Ui Ailella = Barony of Tirerrill; Ui Ailella Ui Maine = Snám Dá Én near Clonmacoise.

Muirgius mac Donnchad, g-g-grandson of Diarmait mac Tadg Mor, reinstates “ri Tire nAilella” @ 1260AD.
Very little information seems available on the early lords of Uí Ailella, and it is not until the 13th century that we find reference to the notable families of the area, ie those of the Ui Briuin. This includes the MacDonnchadha (MacDonagh) and their higher ranked cousins ​​the MacDiarmada (MacDermot) of clann Mhaoil ​Ruanaidh. (https://sites.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/connacht.htm#ail).
This cannot be the same Ui Ailella genetically. MacDonagh & MacDermot descend from Mael Ruanaid Mor who is NEITHER Ui Maine or Ui Ailella, but in fact Ui Briuin genetically. Therefore, I surmise this refers to the territory, not the clan.

While Muirgius mac Donnchada mac Diarmata reinstates “ri Tire nAilella” (northern section of Moylurg in ancient Ui Ailella territory-Tirerril), Donnchad mac Muirchertach mac Diarmata was king of Moylurg @ 1240AD.

I believe St. Patrick has very nearly solved this puzzle, more detailed tests results should prove him correct.

Image
Micheál Ó Rothláin
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

Mike,

A few points:
  1. The Cland Maíl Rúanada have ALWAYS been called Uí Briúin by ancestry and it was known they seized the old Uí Ailella territory, what became the Barony of Tirerrill in Co. Sligo. They were NEVER conflated with the Uí Ailella. The thing that The Tripartite Life seems to be vividly illustrating is that Tirerrill was not the original full extent of the Uí Ailella territory, but merely a shrunken portion of it.
  2. Ailill, progenitor of the Uí Ailella, was a son of Eóchád Muigmedón and a full brother to Brión and Fiachróe Foltsnáthach. That is unequivocal! Thus, all his descendants, if any survived, MUST be R1b-DF105+. As I have stated previously, they MAY be under one or more of the unidentified direct subclades of R1b-DF105. The problem is, they became lost to history before surnames arose in Connacht, so we do not have an easy way to identify them except by process of elimination.
  3. I must emphatically disagree that the Uí Ailella and the Uí Maini were one and the same. The evidence clearly shows they were not, in St. Patrick's milieu. Where I am placing at least part of the territory of the Uí Maini in St. Patrick's milieu is west of what became known as Airteach, which in turn is west of what I think was the original southern region of the Uí Ailella, which in turn was west of Corca Achlann. The Uí Maini teritory may have been due south of Coolavin, or slightly west of due south. It is unclear to me as yet. It also, by implication, seems to have been a smallish territory:
    Then Patrick went into the territory of Húi-Maine, and left there an archdeacon of his household, to wit, Deacon Just, and founded Fidarta. And Patrick left his book of ritual and baptism with him, and baptized Húi-Maine.
    But basically, the geography presented in The Tripartite Life is as follows:

    West <—> East
    Uí Maini (Fidarta) | Airteach (Fairymount) | Uí Ailella (Shankill) | Corca Achlann (Elphin)

    The Ciarraige have been assigned to Airteach by some. IDK how accurate this is; nor am I clear on their ancestry. I am also not clear as to whom the Corca Achlann were. Whether the Uí Maini of St. Patrick's milieu were descendants of the Maine sons of Queen Medb may be possible, but if so, they would not be Dál Cuinn and thus not R1b-DF104+; so I don't know if we will ever be able to identify any of these 3 people by Y-DNA.
  4. There were either 2 different Snám Dá Én crossings on the Shannon River in St. Patrick's milieu, OR the Snám Dá Én crossing at Clonmacnoise was conflated with the Droim ar Snám crossing at Drumsna. I am absolutely convinced beyond ANY doubt that at least on this foray into Connacht, St. Patrick NEVER went any further south than Mag Aí; which means the home of the Uí Briúin in St. Patrick's milieu was NOT Mag Seóla.
Image
BuckeyeMike
Genelach Member
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat, 2021-Feb-06 4:56 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by BuckeyeMike »

Referencing your notes above:
1. ABSOLUTELY! I make no implication the Cland Mail Ruanada were anything other than Ui Briuin, not only by ancestry, but I believe we have shown proof through the DNA. I've spent too much time and effort trying to prove Ui Briuin, Maicne Fergusa, Maicne Eócháda Tírmchárnai (FGC5939), Sil Cellach (FGC36500
?), Cland Mail Ruanada (A6925?) to backtrack now.

2. ABSOLUTELY! We have surmised through the DNA that Brion is DF105+, Ailella would at at the very least be DF105-. (if I have my + and – in the right place?) I have come across a few instances that the Ui Briuin inda Sinna may have actually been Ui Ailella who assimilated with the Ui Briuin Breifne to the east. I need to go back to this at some point.

3. I AGREE, sorta... St. Patrick's time (@450AD) and Ailella’s time (@370AD) was 200 years after nearly all the territory, say west of the Shannon, MAY have been called “Maine”(territory). So, just as we later call Brion’s progeny Ui Briuin “Seola” based on territorial nomenclature, and Ui Briuin “Ai” based on territorial nomenclature, etc., it is feasible to say the Ui Ailella “Maine” as territorial nomenclature as well. And as you accurately pointed out, St. Patrick’s foray was probably fairly compact, not far from Drumsna. The seemingly interchangeable “Ailella” – “Maine” references in the The Tripartite Life hint at a conflation of the two depending on their location inside this very small area. This may be a never ending debate that will go unsolved without more testing.

4. As we have discussed before concerning the origination of Ui Briuin clan names, it was not until Cenn Faelad mac Colgan @663AD that the first mentioned distinguishing clans are made (Seola, Síl Muiredaig, Síl Cellaig, Síl Cathail). In the Silva Gadelica, Brion’s camp
“lay in Dahm Chluin” not far from Knockma Hill, in Seola territory, and “may be an indication of the Uí Briúin's original homeland, as is Aidhne for the Uí Fiachrach”
Again, this was nearly 100 years before St. Patrick. In those 100 years, Ui Briuin (eventually “Seola”) power had already begin to spread thanks to Brion’ 24 sons making their eastern border quickly encroach into Ui Briuin (eventually "Ai"). As you have stated before “This would also explain the animosity between the Uí Briúin Aí and the Uí Briúin Seóla.” So where exactly was the north eastern extent of Mag Seola by 450AD? Close enough to fit St. Patrick’s shortened trip? You may be on to something.

I am still intrigued by the mention of Loch Cé ("a turn, frequently of the alternation of the right of succession as, for instance, between different branches of a family;”) in St. Patrick’s time, just as the Ui Ailella descendants dissappear @ 400AD. It seems plausible that if they were Ui Ailella Maine (again...territory), as the Ui Ailella in the north weaken, the “different branch” of the same family, are now ‘called’ Ui Maine (because they retained territory in the south).

I do not think our R1b-FGC5939 clade is Ui Ailello. I believe the conflation of Cland Maíl Rúanada surnames occurred with Mael Ruanaid. Could it have been the Ui Ailella Maine (again...territorial) forced them to seek help from Ui Conchobar? If we only knew Mael Ruanaid's father...

So many questions, so little time.
Micheál Ó Rothláin
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

Mike,

The Uí Ailella MUST be R1b-DF105+. That means they are positive for the mutations; they have them. R1b-DF105- means someone is negative for the mutations; they don't have them.

Please read this carefully and refer to the locations on the map below:

The geography presented in The Tripartite Life is as follows:

West <—> East
Uí Maini (Fidarta) | Airteach (Fairymount) | Uí Ailella (Shankill) | Corca Achlann (Elphin)

There is absolutely NO conflation of territory at all. The Uí Ailella territory is very distinct from the Uí Maini territory.

Further, the Uí Ailella were very much an active dynasty until ~800 AD, not 400 AD.
Another important battle in 792 was the battle of Ard Maiccrime in County Sligo, where the Uí Ailella were delivered their death blow. Among the slain were Cathmug mac Flaithbertaig of the Cenél Coirpri and Cormac son of Dub dá Crích of the Uí Briúin Bréifne. The Annals of the Four Masters states that Muirgius was the victor in this battle also. The Uí Briúin profited by the decline of the Uí Ailella and a branch of the Síl Muiredaig later occupied Mag Luirg.
[ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muirgius_mac_Tommaltaig ]
Of course, we know that it was NOT a true branch of the Síl Muiredaig that seized Mag Luirg, but rather a probable Uí Briúin, Maicne Eócháda Tírmchárnai family; but definitely R1b-FGC5939+ at any rate.

I am not trying to be rude, but your thesis that the Uí Ailella territory and the Uí Maini territory became conflated is just wrong because it contradicts the facts. The Uí Ailella territory shrunk to the Barony of Tirerrill in Co. Sligo, and the Uí Maini territory in later times was confined to southern Co. Roscommon and into Co. Galway. The 2 territories NEVER appear to have overlapped.

And I am not sure yet that the Uí Maini in St. Patrick's milieu are the same Uí Maini in the later annals entries. Maine was just a man's name with absolutely nothing unique about it.
Image
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

Cell Búadmáil/Buadmóil Revisited

Reading through Tírechán's Collectanea, I was struck with this account of Búaid Máel's grave:
(1) Patrick sent Nie Brain to the Moat of Slecht; (he was) a native close to Patrick, who made miraculous true prophecies (inspired) by God.(2) Patrick came to a lake in the Shannon, to the place where his charioteer Boidmal had died, and he is buried there in what is called Boidmal's Wood to this day, and it had been given to Patrick. This is the end of the first book, (deeds) performed in the territory of the Uí Néill. Here begins the second book, (deeds) performed in the regions of Connaught.
[ https://confessio.ie/more/tirechan_english#TIRE_17_eng ]
The Tripartite Life says:
Then Patrick went into the province of Connaught by Snám dá Én over the Shannon. There Patrick found the fertas (bar? bank?), namely, the earth was raised up under Patrick in the ford; and the learned still find that ridge. And he went into the harbour at once, and there died Buad-moel, Patrick s charioteer, and was buried in that place. Cell Buadmoil is its name, and it belongs to Patrick.
[ p. 93 ]
Re-examining the Charlestown peninsula on the Shannon River, I found that Logainm had this notation for the Charlestown Townland, which is still a heavily wooded area:
1660 Charlestowne/Ardnafryne
The present Charlestown seems to have been a part of Ardanaffrin, which is still the name of an adjacent townland' Éigse VI 280; 'The only Irish form [of Charlestown] known to tradition is Bárr na Coille, M. J. Connellan, Éigse VII, 271.
[ https://www.logainm.ie/en/42787 ]
Barr has several related meanings, one of which is " top, climax, end; crown, supremacy, preeminence, transcendence". There is a similar word búadach which has a meaning of " victorious, triumphant, triumphal, prevailing ; preeminent, having many outstanding qualities, gifted". This second word, of course, has the same root as Búaid Máel. Na has the meaning of "of the" and coille has a meaning of "wood or forest".

Putting this all together, it seems possible there was conflation between caill and cell so that in some sources Caill Búaide Maíl/Búaid Máel's Wood became Cell Búaide Maíl/Búaid Máel's Church. Further, it does not seem unlikely at all then that Caill Búaide Maíl, which because of its location at the tip of the Charlestown peninsula and the similarity in meaning between barr and búadach, mutated from Caill Búaide Maíl/Búaid Máel's Wood to Bárr na Coille (Caille)/Tip or Crown or Prominence of the Wood. This in turn was lost in the Anglicization to Charlestown. Although this is purely speculative, it is entirely plausible.
Image
User avatar
Ollam
Site Admin
Posts: 1188
Joined: Wed, 2019-Jun-26 2:47 pm

Re: St. Patrick And The Uí Ailella

Post by Ollam »

Bishop Cethech Revisited

The Tripartite Life says:
Patrick went thereafter into Tír Cairedo, and founded at Ard Licce a church, namely, Sendomnach; and he left therein Deacon Coemán. And Patrick built (?) Ard Senlis, where he placed holy Lallócc, and he obtained a place in Mag Nento. And they went with bishop Cethech to his country. Of the race of Ailill was Cethech's mother. Of the Cenél Sái of Cianacht from Domnach Sairigi at Dom-liacc Cianáin was his father. And this was the custom of bishop Cethech: in Domnach Sái he used to celebrate the Great Easter, and in Ath-da-Laracc in Cenannus he used to celebrate the Little Easter with Comgilla, for the community of Cethech say that Comgilla was monkess to Cethech.
[ p. 105 ]
And Tírechán says:
(1) Then Patrick came to the plain of Cairith, that is, Mag Cairetho, and they camped in that place, and founded a church in Ard Licce, which is called Sendomnach, (2) and in it he placed the deacon Coimanus, his holy monk, beloved of Christ and Patrick's pupil, and Patrick held Ard Senlis and placed there the holy maiden Laloca, and got possession of a place in Mag Nento.(3) And they went out with the holy bishop Cethiacus to his own territory, because his father was of the kindred of Ailill; his mother was of the kindred of Sai from the regions of Cíanacht, from Domnach Sairigi beside Dom Liacc, that is, the house of stones, of Cíannán.(4) Bishop Cethiacus was in the habit of celebrating in Corcu Sai on the great Easter (gloss: that is, Sunday); the second (day of) Easter he used to stay in the place of holy Comgella at the Ford of Two Forks, that is, Dá Loarcc, beside Kells with Comgella, because the monks of Cethiachus say that Comgella was a nun to Cethiachus.
[ https://www.confessio.ie/more/tirechan_ ... IRE_27_eng ]
We have already covered the conflation of Boyle and Kells previously. Now let us examine "Domnach Sairigi beside Dom Liacc". That is a place in Co. Meath that is thought to be Donaghseery Monastery. This would work for a short journey from there on Sunday to Kells on Monday, but not so much to Boyle.

A POSSIBLE alternative is that "Domnach Sairigi beside Dom Liacc" was conflated with either Leitrim/Liathdruim Mhuintire hEolais or the nearby Drumleague/Droim Liag where Liag and Liacc share the same root of lía, that is, "stone". Dubaltach Mac Fir Bisig mentions the Tradraige and says they "are of the race of Geanann, the son of Deala". O’Donovan adds this annotation:
Race of Geanann, son of Deala—He was a Firbolgic King of Connaught, and ruled, according to Keating and the ancient MS. accounts of this colony, over the district extending from the Luimneach, or Lower Shannon, to the River Drobhaois, now the River Drowis, the boundary between Connaught and Ulster. There was another tribe of the name Tradraighe seated in the territory of Tradry, or Tradree, in the barony of Bunratty, and county of Clare.
[ Hy-Fiachrach, p. 53 ]
This would be most of or all of Connacht plus territory down south to the Lower Shannon. Leitrim might well have been included in this territory at one time. So it does NOT seem unlikely that Geanann was conflated with Cíannán and the Corcu Súad/Suíraige was a misidentification. This is, of course, purely speculative, but it does allow for the possibility of a short journey between Leitrim on Sunday and Boyle on Monday, as described.
Image
Post Reply